More STEM Education for Women with ‘Girl Day’

Girl Day introducing girls to science and engineering - racing

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, women make up 47% of the total U.S. workforce, but comprise only 39% of chemists and material scientists, 27.9% of environmental scientists and geoscientists, 8.3% of electrical and electronic engineers, and 7.2% of mechanical engineers.

Enter Girl Day, an event created to combat such numbers by DiscoverE, a volunteer organization with the mission, according to Thea Sahr, its director of programs, “to sustain and grow a dynamic engineering profession through outreach, education, celebration, and volunteerism.” READ MORE

Should STEM become STEAM? via The Atlantic

Recently in a video The Atlantic asked a group of academics within some of America’s top universities to debate how STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) could benefit from another letter. “I have no hesitation in saying we need to add the letter A,” says Harvard University education professor Howard Gardner. “An education devoid of arts…is an empty, half-brain kind of education.” Other panelists include Sebastian Thrun, Drew Faust, Erika Christakis, and Nicholas Dirks. READ MORE

Study Shows Girls and Minorities Missing from Sciences

the balance is against women and sciences in the classroom

(New York Times) A big reason America is falling behind other countries in science and math is that we have effectively written off a huge chunk of our population as uninterested in those fields or incapable of succeeding in them.

Women make up nearly half the work force but have just 26 percent of science, technology, engineering or math jobs, according to the Census Bureau. Blacks make up 11 percent of the workforce but just 6 percent of such jobs and Hispanics make up nearly 15 percent of the work force but hold 7 percent of those positions. There is no question that women and minorities have made progress in science and math in the last several decades, but their gains have been slow and halting. And in the fast-growing field of computer science, women’s representation has actually declined in the last 20 years, while minorities have made relatively small gains. Read More