MSU engineering students building ‘car of the future’

engineering students building electric car of the future

MSU Engineering Students

STARKVILLE, Miss.–Driven to lead in vehicle performance and energy efficiency, Mississippi State University engineers are steering development of the “Car of the Future.” Though the vehicle may look like a typical crossover SUV, its engine will not be connected to the wheels like conventional automobiles. Instead, the engine will rotate a generator that charges an energy storage system which will provide power to two electric motors driving the rear wheels. “Our focus here is trying to demonstrate Mississippi State’s capabilities in developing advanced technology to enhance vehicle technology,” said principal investigator Zach Rowland, deputy director of MSU’s Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems. “The goal is to advance the technologies by developing the engineering technology and the engineers that will help promote and advance vehicle design.” READ MORE

Student Electric Car with 310 Mile Range in Australia

Student Electric Car with Panasonic Batteries - Wired.com Wired Magazine

Glenn Ong/UNSW Australia Sunswift

(WIRED) Tesla has a new competitor, and it’s not from BMW or General Motors. It’s from Australian university students, whose electric Sunswift eVe set a new world record for fastest average speed—more than 60mph—over 500 kilometers (310 miles) on a single battery charge, on July 23. That’s a big deal: Range is the biggest issue holding back the widespread adoption of EVs, and this record shows the car can drive hundreds of miles at a reasonable highway speed. It stomped on the old record, a mere 45 mph, and drove farther than even the Tesla Model S, the current king of EVs, can go on a full charge.

The eVe is a lovely-looking car whose battery pack can be charged from a regular wall outlet, or using the array of solar panels on its hood and roof. It’s the fifth vehicle made by the students, from the University of New South Wales; its predecessors date back to 1996 and include the IVy, which still holds the record for fastest drive by a solar-powered vehicle at 55 mph, set in 2011. Read More

Welcome Back to School from Electric Auto Shop

Back to School and Electric Auto Shop

Welcome Back to School!

American River College Attends Instructor Training [VIDEO]

Special thanks to the instructors from American River College.

 

[VIDEO] Crowdfunding Teaches Kids about Government

Hey, teachers! Crowdfunding is becoming an alternative source of funding for educational projects, like building electric cars, but it can also teach kids about taking initiative and responsibility for their own education.  Check out the video below, a news story about how crowdfunding helps kids learn about government.  Contact us if you would like assistance in crowdfunding your next EV project.

Students learn about crowd funding

Solar Roadway Wins Crowdfunding

Thanks to a 9-yr-old for sharing this cool video with us about Solar Roadways, which is on the verge of achieving its $1,000,000 crowd-funding goal.

From Indiegogo:

Solar Roadways is a modular paving system of solar panels that can withstand the heaviest of trucks (250,000 pounds). These Solar Road Panels can be installed on roads, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, bike paths, playgrounds… literally any surface under the sun. EVs will be able to charge with energy from the sun (instead of fossil fuels) from parking lots and driveways and after a roadway system is in place, mutual induction technology will allow for charging while driving. Read More

PODCAST 127: Team Captain of Formula Hybrid Winner, Dartmouth’s Eric Din

Dartmouth Formula Racing - Winner of the 2014 Formula Hybrid at NH

Formula Hybrid Winners: Top row, left to right: Paul Hogan, Christopher Rhoades, Eric Din, William Jewett; Bottom row, left to right: Arthur Bledsoe, Erik Skarin (driver), Sean Hammett

Our latest Podcast is with Eric Leung Din, Captain of the Dartmouth Formula Racing Team. Dartmouth recently won the Electric Division of the 2014 Formula Hybrid Competition. PODCAST: LISTEN NOW

If you’re wondering about the secret behind Dartmouth’s win, Eric Din dishes out some juicy details on the Podcast, like who supplied the motor/controller, who supplied the battery management, and why the car is named Shona. Of course, Dartmouth had home field advantage as host for the competition along with the Thayer School of Engineering. Read more of this post