Student Electric Car with 310 Mile Range in Australia

Student Electric Car with Panasonic Batteries - Wired.com Wired Magazine

Glenn Ong/UNSW Australia Sunswift

(WIRED) Tesla has a new competitor, and it’s not from BMW or General Motors. It’s from Australian university students, whose electric Sunswift eVe set a new world record for fastest average speed—more than 60mph—over 500 kilometers (310 miles) on a single battery charge, on July 23. That’s a big deal: Range is the biggest issue holding back the widespread adoption of EVs, and this record shows the car can drive hundreds of miles at a reasonable highway speed. It stomped on the old record, a mere 45 mph, and drove farther than even the Tesla Model S, the current king of EVs, can go on a full charge.

The eVe is a lovely-looking car whose battery pack can be charged from a regular wall outlet, or using the array of solar panels on its hood and roof. It’s the fifth vehicle made by the students, from the University of New South Wales; its predecessors date back to 1996 and include the IVy, which still holds the record for fastest drive by a solar-powered vehicle at 55 mph, set in 2011. Read More

Solar Roadway Wins Crowdfunding

Thanks to a 9-yr-old for sharing this cool video with us about Solar Roadways, which is on the verge of achieving its $1,000,000 crowd-funding goal.

From Indiegogo:

Solar Roadways is a modular paving system of solar panels that can withstand the heaviest of trucks (250,000 pounds). These Solar Road Panels can be installed on roads, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, bike paths, playgrounds… literally any surface under the sun. EVs will be able to charge with energy from the sun (instead of fossil fuels) from parking lots and driveways and after a roadway system is in place, mutual induction technology will allow for charging while driving. Read More

PODCAST 117: San Francisco Auto Show Preview

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!  This is the auto show show of sorts because we are excited that the Chassis Lab Switch electric car kit has been invited for an educational display as part of the 56th Annual San Francisco International Auto Show. The show runs November 28 through December 2nd as San Francisco’s Moscone Center. PODCASTLISTEN Read more of this post

High School Students Put First Satellite into Orbit

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We’re always excited when students take their alternative fuel vehicle out in the track for the first time, but into outer space?

That’s exactly what students from a hi-tech high in Alexandria, Virginia are preparing to do, according to GizModo. Thomas Jefferson High School is hitching a ride on a Minotaur rocket with their TJ3SAT Cube to beam data back and forth to their website.

The launch is happening tonight, so grab your popcorn.

That just goes to show you, don’t ever underestimate what young people can do. They’ll always surprise you. Read More

PODCAST 116: Are We There Yet?

More AFVs coming out on the market, and why students are more important than ever
We live in interesting times when several models of alternatively fueled vehicles are now on the open market, with more coming out.  As developers of alternative fuel vehicles, on this episode of the podcast Mike and Alex talk about why Electric Auto Shop is more relevant than ever. PodcastListen Here

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New invention ‘harvests’ electricity from background radiation

New invention 'harvests' electricity from background radiation and could be used to beam power to remote locations or recharge phones wirelessly  Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2493931/New-device-harvests-electricity-background-radiation-like-Wi-Fi.html#ixzz2kMVuytum Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Could be used to beam power to remote locations or recharge phones wirelessly

  • Device captures microwaves and converts them into electricity

  • Future versions could harvest satellite, sound or Wi-Fi signals

  • Technology could be used to recharge phones without cables or beam electricity to mountaintops

Engineers at Duke University have designed a breakthrough gadget that ‘harvests’ background microwave radiation and converts it into electricity, with the same efficiency as solar panels.

The development, unveiled on Thursday, raises exciting possibilities such as recharging a phone wirelessly and providing power to remote locations that can’t access conventional electricity.

And the researchers say that their inexpensive invention is remarkably versatile. It could be used to capture ‘lost’ energy from a range of sources such as satellite transmissions, sound signals or Wi-Fi. Read More